Meeting Our Growers Halfway

The process of fermentation is like a universal donor - there is some way to preserve any food by just controlling the direction of its rot.  If there is nutrition there, we as humans are not the only ones looking to feed from it - there are millions of little bacteria ready to jump in front of us in line.  It's one of the most exciting things about running a business for whom fermentation is the primary technique that we can support a wide variety of growers.  Almost anything with a decent amount of sugar can eventually become vinegar.  

That means that we can support farmers who grow grains, fruits, and vegetables, growers who keep bees and produce honey, guys who tap maple trees.  We can tap into the incredible amount of perfect produce that will never get put up for sale to the public because it's the wrong size, or has a little character to its appearance. It's the best way that we figured out how to support the entire landscape of local agriculture.  You got a lot of clingstone peaches with split pits early in the season?  You can't sell them at market?  Hook me up, peach vinegar coming right up (about this time next year; it's a long process).  

Viognier grapes from Mark Cascia Vineyard on Kent Island.  Mark had no room left in his tanks, so he had no reason to harvest these until we came along.

Viognier grapes from Mark Cascia Vineyard on Kent Island.  Mark had no room left in his tanks, so he had no reason to harvest these until we came along.